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Strange facts you don’t know – Part 6

Nasa releases James Webb Space Telescope`s first images

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has passed another milestone on its way to space. After years of assembly and testing, the most powerful space telescope ever built began environmental testing in a special chamber at Nasa’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, US. This phase will test how it reacts to the vibrations and acoustics of a rocket launch, as well as the vacuum of space and wide swings in temperature. Eventually, JWST will be blasted into orbit 1.5 million km (1 million miles) from Earth. It is designed to peer back 13 billion years before our current time frame with the ability to hunt for chemical signatures of life on distant planets beyond our solar system.”We have been working toward this point for over a decade,” says John Mather, Nobel laureate and senior project scientist for JWST at Nasa’s Goddard Space Flight Center.”It is thrilling to begin final preparations for launch,” he adds.”We are excited to see these critical tests underway.” The $8 billion observatory is scheduled for launch next year on an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana

After years of assembly and testing, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has passed another milestone on its way to space.

After years of assembly and testing, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has passed another milestone on its way to space.

The spacecraft was launched in December 2018 on an Ariane 5 rocket from Kourou in French Guiana. It will be placed at Lagrange point 2 (L2) where it will be able to observe targets thousands of times farther away than Hubble — up to 10 billion light-years away from Earth — with very high resolution. JWST is designed to study the formation and evolution of galaxies, stars and planets as well as their chemical composition; more specifically it will look for clues that could help us understand how our own solar system came about!

The telescope is so large that it has to be folded up and stowed inside the Ariane 5 rocket before launch. Once in orbit, it will unfold like a giant flower. It will be placed at Lagrange point 2 (L2), where it will be able to observe targets thousands of times farther away than Hubble — up to 10 billion light-years away from Earth — with very high resolution.

JWST is designed to study the formation and evolution of galaxies, stars and planets as well as their chemical composition; more specifically it will look for clues that could help us understand how our own solar system came about! The telescope is so large that it has to be folded up and stowed inside the Ariane 5 rocket before launch. Once in orbit, it will unfold like a giant flower. It will be placed at Lagrange point 2 (L2), where it will be able to observe targets thousands of times farther away than Hubble — up to 10 billion light-years away from Earth — with very high resolution.

JWST will also be able to see the very first stars and galaxies that formed after the Big Bang. It will study how galaxies evolve over time, how stars form within them, and what happens when they die.

Vibrations and acoustics are two different things but they both deal with how something feels when you touch or hear it. Vibration tests involve shaking up an object while measuring its response—for example if you shake a cup vigorously enough then some water may spill out or if you hold your hands close together tightly enough then they’ll start shaking side-to-side rapidly! Acoustic testing involves placing an object under water so sound waves can come through its surface (think pinging bells).

 

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